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The best PS1 games to play in 2024

Still have your PlayStation kicking about? Here are some of the best games you can still play on it today.

A mixture of screenshots and key artwork from five different PS1 games are shown. From left to right: Silent Hill, Gran Turismo, Mega Man X3, Dino Crisis, and Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver
Image credit: VG247/Konami/Japan Studio/Capcom/Crystal Dynamics

The PlayStation first shipped in 1994 and very quickly made its way into the homes of gamers worldwide. It’s a console that - alongside the PlayStation 2 - many hold near and dear, for good reason. The console was home to a multitude of RPG’s, action games, and highly successful series that were finding their footing at the time, garnering Sony plenty of power that it’s since held on to and grown…for the most part.

We’re very quickly approaching the 30th anniversary of the console too (December 3), so now’s a better time than ever to check out - and celebrate - the catalogue of diverse and innovative games that were launched on the platform. Warning: there are a lot of RPGs and action-adventure games to sift through (though, not a bad thing!), and plenty of these games have since been remade in HD, but the PS1 era still has its charm. There’s no denying that, especially given the amount of unique PS1 demakes that have come about in recent years.


Alucard speaks with another character in Castlevania Symphony of the Night
Image credit: Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo

Castlevania: Symphony of the Night

Developer: Konami Computer Entertainment Tokyo

Released: 1997

Kelsey Raynor: If you like action-RPG side scrollers as well as vampires, then Castlevania: Symphony of the Night might be the PS1 game for you. You play as Dracula’s son, Alucard, in this sequel, as you explore Dracula’s castle and strive to find five different pieces of the classic antagonist.

Throughout, you’ll find yourself venturing across gorgeous 2D interiors, privy to a range of outstanding and varied music composed by Michiru Yamane, and ultimately rounding off a bittersweet story. Castlevania: Symphony of the Night has its cult status for a reason, let’s put it that way.

Spyro the Dragon jumps toward a chest with Sparx beside him
Image credit: Insomniac Games

Spyro the Dragon

Developer: Insomniac Games

Released: 1998

KR: When it comes to this heroic purple dragon, Spyro, you actually have three games to pick from for the PS1. There's the first game in the series, Spyro the Dragon, but also Spyro 2: Ripto’s Rage, and Spyro: Year of the Dragon to consider if you can’t get enough of this playful protagonist and his adorable partner, Sparx.

Spyro the Dragon was where the series began, and it primarily exists of exploring different realms to rescue fellow dragons and loot collectibles, while enduring an ongoing plight against antagonist, Gnasty Gnorc. Much like the Crash Bandicoot series which debuted around the same time, Spyro the Dragon was an incredibly vibrant, jovial take on the 3D platformer genre, with an incredibly loveable protagonist at its center.

A scene from Silent Hill that shows Harry 
approaching a gate marked 'BEWARE OF DOG'.

Silent Hill

Developer: Team Silent

Released: 1999

KR: A survival-horror game developed by Team Silent and published by Konami, Silent Hill was where the cult series began, with ‘everyman’ protagonist Harry Mason at its center. Harry winds up in the eponymous town of Silent Hill in search of his adopted daughter, Cheryl, and he ends up troubled by nightmarish visions, cultists, and psychological distress in the process.

Silent Hill can only be described as one of the scariest horror games on the PS1, having mastered atmosphere and managing to unnerve players using its fog-draped scenery and rusty Otherworld. Paired with an industrial-ambient soundtrack from Akira Yamaoka, and let’s just say that you’re in for a very interesting time while playing Silent Hill, if you haven’t already.

The player performs a skateboard trick in Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 2
Image credit: Neversoft

Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 2

Developer: Neversoft

Released: 2000

KR: Developed by Neversoft and published by Activision, Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 2 was the second installment in the skating-game series. Mainly a grand improvement on its predecessor, you’ll be performing slick tricks aboard four wheels to progress and unlock new gear in this game, as you’d expect from most skateboarding games.

Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 2 also features multiplayer and a level editor, so if you fancy creating your own ramps and gaps for you and your crew to traverse, you can do just that. On top of that, you can also look forward to seeing familiar pro skaters, such as Tony Hawk himself, Steve Caballero, and more.

Lara Croft fires at a dinosaur in Tomb Raider
Image credit: Core Design

Tomb Raider

Developer: Core Design

Released: 1996

KR: Remember when Lara Croft’s design was particularly triangular? That was Tomb Raider (1996), which at the time, blew many people’s minds. While the controls are definitely dated by now (as is the case for most games on this list), you can expect to have a great time following the British archeologist as she attempts to find the Scion of Atlantis.

You can expect plenty of variety from the game too, whether it comes to levels you’re completing or the enemies you’re facing, making it plain to see how Tomb Raider has ended up with just as many sequels as it has. A highly sophisticated take on the adventure game, you definitely ought to play this if you haven’t already.

Barret and Marlene are shown in a church in Final Fantasy 7
Image credit: Square

Final Fantasy VII, VIII, IX

Developer: Square

Released: 1997 (VII), 1999 (VIII), 2000 (IX)

Alex Donaldson: Is it a cheat to have three games? Well, the PS1 is home to quite a few classic trilogies - and while each of the Final Fantasy titles is a stand-alone adventure, each has its own strengths, values, and memorable elements that make each a classic. You might not vibe with all three of them - but you'd have to be truly heartless to vibe with none of them.

Arguably, these three games most keenly represent the Silver Age of the Japanese RPG. This isn't just a continuation of that SNES golden era, though - it's an evolution. New, different, and pushing the envelope. There's a reason that Final Fantasy 7 is one of the most important games of all time - but its two direct successors also have something to offer.

If I might posit a theory, it's this: Like I said, Final Fantasy 7 is one of the most important games of all time. But Final Fantasy 8 is one of the most mechanically fascinating JRPGs ever made. Final Fantasy 9, meanwhile, is the medium's storytelling at its heart-rending best. All three are well worth your time.

The player looks at moving their characters in Final Fantasy Tactics
Image credit: Square

Final Fantasy Tactics

Developer: Square

Released: 1997

AD: If you ask a contrarian what the best Final Fantasy game is, there's a good chance they'll answer with this one. Final Fantasy Tactics is a brilliant game - but it's a different sort of game. It's technically a follow-up to Yasumi Matsuno's beloved Ogre Battle series, but drapes that sublimely balanced tactical RPG in the regalia of Final Fantasy - and the result is fantastic.

The influence of Final Fantasy Tactics can't be overstated. Square would go on to set Final Fantasy 12 in the same world, while other entries including FF16 were heavily inspired by it. Even Fallout was inspired by FFT - its developers drawing on it directly for the lore-altering 2001 spin-off Fallout Tactics.

Rayman platforms towards a musical note
Image credit: Ubi Pictures

Rayman

Developer: Ubi Pictures

Released: 1995

KR: Rayman came to life on the PlayStation (as well as the Atari Jaguar and Sega Saturn), introducing players to a chaotic platformer full of limbless humanoids. Throughout this adventure, you can expect to play as Rayman as he strives to rescue multiple Electoons, who have gone missing after the antagonist - Mr Dark - steals the one thing holding them all together, the Great Protoon.

Rayman still holds up now, and don’t let its child-like graphics fool you; the game offers a real challenge in some of its levels, and there’s plenty of sequels - and the Raving Rabbids spin-off series - if you find you can’t get enough.

Crash approaches a bridge marked with a 'danger' sign in Crash Bandicoot
Image credit: Naughty Dog

Crash Bandicoot

Developer: Naughty Dog

Released: 1996

KR: Another platformer brought to life on the PlayStation is Crash Bandicoot, which - surprise, surprise - has a genetically enhanced bandicoot, Crash, at the forefront of it. In a similar vein to most vibrant, chaotic adventure games like this, Crash is on a journey to rescue his girlfriend from antagonist, Cortex, who is set on achieving world-domination.

While that isn’t the most innovative plot of all time, Crash Bandicoot’s gameplay doesn’t let players down. Across 32 levels, you’ll be platforming across different perspectives and avoiding various obstacles as you try to get closer to your lost lover, and all in all, it’s a satisfying time. Much like Rayman, Crash Bandicoot also received multiple sequels, so you’ve plenty of content to get through if you find yourself enamored by the clever bandicoot.

Aya Brea fights with a monstrous enemy in Parasite Eve
Image credit: Square

Parasite Eve

Developer: Square

Released: 1998

KR: Parasite Eve acts as a sequel to a novel of the same name that is, to be frank, pretty hard to get your hands on. No, seriously. One eBay listing for the novel is currently £800 at the time of writing (which I don’t see anyone purchasing anytime soon), which is a testament to the cult classic that both the novel, and the 1998 action-RPG game, have become in that time.

The game itself plays out a little like early Resident Evil titles, with you playing as a police officer attempting to stop titular character Eve from destroying the human race. But you can expect plenty of RPG elements that feel akin to Final Fantasy VII, too. On top of that, there’s also Parasite Eve 2 available on the PS1 if you find you can't get enough of this dark, action RPG.

The player drives along a long stretch of road at night in Driver
Image credit: Reflections Interactive

Driver

Developer: Reflections Interactive

Released: 1999

Driver took inspiration from late 60’s and early 70’s car movies, such as The Driver (1978), and tried to emulate that experience in-game. During Driver, you’re a former racecar driver and now undercover police detective who’s been tasked with investigating a crime syndicate. It’s a simple narrative, but it’s all you need in this thrilling driving game, which was one of the first of its kind.

As Tanner, you’ll spend your time speeding around open-world destinations such as San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and Miami as you take part in high-speed chases and play the role of the getaway driver for the gang, among other missions. And the good news is that if you like Driver, there’s also Driver 2 to play on the PlayStation too.

Crash races through a tunnel using a kart in Crash Team Racing
Image credit: Naughty Dog

Crash Team Racing

Developer: Naughty Dog

Released: 1999

KR: That genetically enhanced bandicoot you all know and love obviously has another entry on this list, and that’s with Crash Team Racing. The clue is in the name for this particular game, which sees the likes of Crash Bandicoot and fellow characters from the series racing against one another. In the simplest of terms, it’s Mario Kart with bandicoots (and an evil scientist).

Much like other laid-back racing games, you can expect power-ups galore, as well as a bit of grinding. You’ll need to win races to unlock more tracks and ultimately get the most out of the game, but that’s nothing new here, and discovery of new tracks is part of the fun!

The character selection screen in Twisted Metal, where the player hovers Sweet Tooth and his ice cream van
Image credit: SingleTrac

Twisted Metal

Developer: SingleTrac

Released: 1995

KR: Twisted Metal is definitely chaotic, and in this game, rather than using vehicles to race one another, you’re instead using your vehicles to battle with each other. It’s just as exciting as it sounds, allowing you to arm your car or truck with ballistics, guns, and more as you try to take opponents down in this demolition derby.

Your goal is to be the last one standing, with the promise of a single wish being granted by your host - Calypso - if you make it. And if you enjoy Twisted Metal, the good news is that there are multiple sequels to dabble with, and even a recent TV adaptation which was apparently pretty good.

Snake speaks with another character about current events in Metal Gear Solid
Image credit: Konami

Metal Gear Solid

Developer: Konami Computer Entertainment Japan

Released: 1998

KR: Back in 1998, Konami released the action-adventure game that is Metal Gear Solid, which has since become a multi-game series like many of the games on this list. And, of course, for good reason. MGS sees you playing as the one and only Solid Snake as he attempts to infiltrate a nuclear weapons facility, where he’s tasked with rescuing hostages and preventing a nuclear disaster.

Pretty big demands for one guy to undertake, but as you step into the shoes of Solid Snake, you’ll soon see why MGS is as unforgettable as everyone makes it out to be. And if you find yourself a particularly big fan of Metal Gear Solid, you’ve multiple sequels to look forward to playing, including one of the best story games, Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater.

Specter speaks ominously to the player in Ape Escape
Image credit: Japan Studio

Ape Escape

Developer: Japan Studio

Released: 1999

James Billcliffe: Where humanity asserts its dominance over the animal kingdom with its opposable thumb, the original PlayStation did it with the analogue stick.

It’s hard to imagine now, but the PS1 launched without the twiddly bits that make movement in games so easy these days, and one of the best games to make full use of this cutting-edge technology was Ape Escape.

It’s a simple concept: they’re apes, they’ve escaped, and it’s your job to monkey around stuffing them back where they belong. Biffing monkeys on the head and crashing a net down directionally in 360 degrees felt so tactile, while strong visual design put a great spin on the collect-a-thon genre.

Later games would go on to parody movies and other video game franchises (look up the MGS level in Ape Escape 3, you won’t be disappointed) and I can’t believe it’s been 20 years since they made one of these. Imagine what you could do with Sony’s first-party line-up these days: sneaking between Clickers in The Last of Apes: Part 2, bumbling through slapstick fights in God of War: Orangutan, and battling giant robot monkeys in Horizon: Forbidden Chimps.

Chris Redfield shoots a zombie in Resident Evil (1996)
Image credit: Capcom

Resident Evil 1-3

Developer: Capcom

Released: 1996 (1), 1998 (2), 1999 (3)

KR: How about three games at once? Well, Resident Evil 1 through 3 are all available on the PlayStation (and just about everywhere else at this point, too). In 2024, you might be more inclined to play the remakes, and I can’t blame you, but the original games - especially Resident Evil 3: Nemesis - are still well worth your time.

The first few games in the Resident Evil series are survival horror at its best. You’ll get to meet an unforgettable array of recurring characters while avoiding becoming zombie food, and can expect clever puzzles and formidable bosses throughout the series. The good news is that, Resident Evil 5 and 6 aside (for the most part), the series is still going and remains stronger than ever.

Two Gon's face one another in Tekken 3
Image credit: Namco

Tekken 3

Developer: Namco

Released: 1997

Connor Makar: Tekken 3 may not have been the first game in the series, but it was the entry from which a legendary franchise was born. Even today it stands out as this almost perfect 3D fighter, packed with iconic characters your dad might even recognize, excellent design all around, and a 3D fighting system that would capture the hearts of millions around the world.

It is showing its age, perhaps. But Tekken 3 helped make the PlayStation a go-to console for many who hungered for a new, exciting competitive experience. It also deserves kudos for bringing the world Tekken Force, as well as the much-beloved Tekken Ball. A fantastic package that stands the test of time.

Clock Tower

Developer: Human Entertainment

Released: 1996

KR: Clock Tower was first released on the Super Famicom exclusively in Japan in 1995. While that version of the game remained exclusive to Japan, Human Entertainment later made another game in the series, also called Clock Tower, that was released worldwide in 1996.

This point-and-click horror game takes place in Norway as characters strive to survive the Scissorman, who has returned once more. Amidst this, characters are also trying to get to the bottom of who Scissorman really is, with events that unfold being based on player actions. It’s slower paced than what Resident Evil fans may be used to, but horror fans will find it delightful.

PaRappa the Rapper mixes flour while baking
Image credit: NanaOn-Sha

Parappa the Rapper

Developer: NanaOn-Sha

Released: 1996 (Japan), 1997 (EU/NA)

KR: PaRappa the Rapper is one of the sillier games on this list, with it being a rhythm game following a dog that is trying to woo his love interest - a flower, of all things - before another dog beats him to it. Each stage in this game sees you, PaRappa, rapping your way through a performance, and you can only progress if your rhythm is - simply put - on point.

While rapping his way through this particular journey, you’ll also see PaRappa learn karate and learn to drive in an effort to earn Sunny’s - his flowery love interest - affections. All in all, the game is pretty goofy, but it’s got some catchy music that makes an otherwise rather basic game hard to put down.

Three different Vib Ribbon characters are shown in key art for the game
Image credit: NanaOn-Sha

Vib Ribbon

Developer: NanaOn-Sha

Released: 1999

JB: Vib Ribbon is an experimental fever dream of a rhythm game, developed by NanaOn-Sha after its breakout success with PaRappa the Rapper - presumably on mushrooms while walking around MoMA.

After sucking up the sound from a track, Vib Ribbon spits out a stark, white vector lined obstacle course, and only a giant rabbit with kaleidoscope pupils that wouldn’t look out of place on the dancefloor at the Hacienda on one of Madchester’s wildest nights is up to the task.

But Vib’s scant, trippy visual style apparently comes from necessity as much as aesthetics. It’s light enough to run on just the PlayStation’s internal memory, which meant you could swap out the game disc for your own CDs to generate custom courses from your own collection. Whether you wanted to keep the ‘90s electronica vibe going with Aphex Twin’s Selected Ambient Works or take a sharp left turn into Nu Metal, you could do it; and the results were always great.

Spider-Man fights with Scorpion inside an office building
Image credit: Neversoft

Spider-Man

Developer: Neversoft

Released: 2000

KR: Spider-Man has moved onto much greener pastures since 2000, with recent games - Marvel’s Spider-Man and Marvel’s Spider-Man 2 - going down an absolute treat with fans of the agile superhuman. But that doesn’t mean Spider-Man’s first foray into gaming was bad; it was, in fact, pretty good.

As is to be expected from a game about Spider-Man, you’ll find yourself swinging about from building to building and combating some iconic antagonists, with impressive voice acting to make most players - and Marvel fans - smile in one way or another. Ultimately, if you want a superhero-led action-adventure for the PS1, Spider-Man is your best bet.

Mega Man swipes with his weapon while jumping down on an enemy in Mega Man X3
Image credit: Capcom

Mega Man X3

Developer: Capcom

Released: 1995

JB: Mega Man has always been aesthetically awesome, but what could make it even better? Well, ‘90s anime cutscenes, of course!

Mega Man might be best-known for his classic NES outings, but there were some rock-solid (and rock-hard) entries into the more story-rich and Saturday morning cartoon-styled X series on PlayStation.

Hilariously unfair - although I definitely didn’t think it was funny at the time - X3 is a relatively pure distillation of everything that made Mega Man great: tough, exacting gameplay, perfect parallax backgrounds and rock-paper-scissors boss power-ups that propelled you from one level to the next.

Dance Dance Revolution

Developer: Bemani

Released: 1999

KR: Dance Dance Revolution is a game you’ll be used to seeing in arcades for the most part, with it usually attached to a large machine that boasts a dance mat. If you’re unfamiliar, DDR tasks the player with moving their feet to the beat, stomping on various arrows as they flash on screen, performing some often daft-looking dance moves in the process.

It’s good fun for those taking part and those watching, and with it playable on the PS1 as of 1999 (exclusively in Japan until 2001), people could enjoy arcade fun from home, too. Though there’s no denying that DDR has since been replaced by modern dancing games such as Just Dance, its legacy is one that’s hard to forget. Stay cool!

A dinosaur lunges at Regina in Dino Crisis
Image credit: Capcom

Dino Crisis 1-2

Developer: Capcom

Released: 1999 (1), 2000 (2)

KR: Dino Crisis and Dino Crisis 2 both launched on the PlayStation in 1999 and 2000 respectively, coming from the same team behind the first installments of the Resident Evil series. And considering they were great, Dino Crisis obviously wound up being quite the prehistoric blast, too.

A survival-horror that pits you against hungry dinosaurs rather than brain-dead zombies, Shinji Makami and his team took inspiration from Aliens and Jurassic Park - and everything they’d learnt so far from Resident Evil - as they strived to move away from the more fantastical elements of the Resi series and create something more real. Now, with the Resident Evil remakes well under way, where is the Dino Crisis remake at, Capcom?

Multiple cars are shown racing one another on a racetrack in Gran Turismo
Image credit: Japan Studio

Gran Turismo

Developer: Japan Studio

Released: 1997

JB: The original Gran Turismo is a painstaking labour of love that, without wishing to romanticise overwork, is emblematic of the commitment to detail and quality that now characterises Sony’s first-party games.

A mammoth undertaking developed by director Kazunori Yamauchi and a small team over 5 years, Gran Turismo was uniquely Japanese, fusing the excitement and authenticity of classic arcade sim cabinets like Out Run, Virtua Racing and Daytona USA, with the emergent tuner culture of the real-life Midnight Club racing scene.

Gran Turismo had a level of depth, scale and sophistication that was unmatched even by other legendary racing games. Where the original Gran Turismo roared out of the pits with 140 cars, Codemasters’ (also excellent) Colin McRae Rally had… 12.

This was one of the games that announced Sony as a serious player in the console gaming space, it was the racing game to beat - and more than 25 years later, that race is still running.

Raziel approaches the Wraith Blade/Soul Reaver in Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver
Image credit: Crystal Dynamics

Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver

Developer: Crystal Dynamics

Released: 1999

KR: The second game in the action-adventure series that is Legacy of Kain - and no doubt the best - is Soul Reaver. You’ll play as Raziel, a vampire, in the gothic world of Nosgoth; a society dominated by vampires and slowly, but surely, decaying as a result. It’s pretty apparent that things can’t continue as they are, so The Elder God intervenes and tasks Raziel with putting an end to the antagonist (and first game, Blood Omen’s protagonist), Kain.

The game itself sees Raziel jumping between different spectral planes to progress, solving challenging puzzles and engaging in hack-and-slash combat while he does so. And last, but not least, you can expect to experience some phenomenal character development too.

WipEout 2097

Developer: Psygnosis

Released: 1996

KR: A Jim Trinca game through and through, WipEout 2097 is an anti-gravity racing game that attempts to capture a futuristic, fast-paced feel, and it’s rather successful in doing so. Your job here is to partake in some intense, high-speed races and beat your opponents, but there’s a small twist (other than the fact you’re traveling at intergalactic speeds): the opportunity to straight-up destroy your fellow racers aircrafts if you’ve the weapons to do so.

WipEout 2097 builds on its predecessor with new circuits and weapons, as well as new difficulty levels for newcomers and veterans. And let’s not forget the banging big-beat electronic soundtrack that accompanies it, featuring tracks from The Prodigy, Fluke, and The Chemical Brothers.

Leena speaks to the player while standing on a pier in Chrono Cross
Image credit: Square

Chrono Cross

Developer: Square

Released: 1999

AD: Much-maligned for not being enough like its predecessor at the time of release, Chrono Cross has undergone something of a re-evaluation in the years since. It has been correctly recognized as a work of genius.

It's a brave sequel - building something new on the most basic bones of the original game rather than simply iterating. With a fascinating branching story and one of the best soundtracks ever, it's a classic. Where Final Fantasy on PS1 offered Hollywood blockbuster, Chrono Trigger is like that smaller-budget darling that ends up criminally overlooked.

Dart observes rock fireflies alongside his companions in The Legend of Dragoon
Image credit: Japan Studio

The Legend of Dragoon

Developer: Japan Studio

Released: 1999

KR: Would you look at that… it’s yet another RPG on the PlayStation. The Legend of Dragoon is one that certainly stands out from the crowd over two decades later, even if it didn’t quite stand out against Final Fantasy at the time. Stepping into the shoes of Dart, who wishes to seek revenge against the Black Monster for the death of his parents and destruction of his hometown, you’ll end up on a perilous journey alongside memorable companions to ultimately save the world from the looming threat of darkness.

Its graphics and cutscenes were something to boast about at the time, with characters you’ll become attached to, and a stellar soundtrack from Takeo Miratsu and Dennis Martin to back it all up. The Legend of Dragoon, all in all, is a touching RPG, and while it isn’t flawless, it still remains as one of the better and more memorable adventures at the time.

Riskbreaker, Ashley Riot, approaches an enemy in Vagrant Story
Image credit: Square Product Development Division 4

Vagrant Story

Developer: Square Product Development Division 4

Released: 2000

KR: One more RPG and then we’re nearly done with this list, I promise! It comes as absolutely no surprise that Vagrant Story was an underrated hit, especially given that it was largely developed by the same team behind Final Fantasy Tactics. This is the type of game that I easily bounce off just because of how deep it gets; systems, story, the whole nine yards, but this is undeniably the bread and butter for some RPG fans, and ultimately what makes Vagrant Story so great.

Playing as Riskbreaker, Ashley Riot, you’re tasked with checking out some strange events occurring in a nearby ancient city… but things get so much more complex than the cult you’ll quickly discover is behind them. Sure enough, you wind up with the weight of the world on your shoulders as you try to save the city, all while uncovering more mysteries and beating up bad guys along the way. Simply put, if you’ve the time to commit to learning Vagrant Story’s systems and committing to it, you won’t be disappointed.

The player shoots at enemies in Time Crisis
Image credit: Namco

Time Crisis

Developer: Namco

Released: 1997

KR: Time Crisis, like some other entries on this list, started life as an arcade game in 1995. One of those with plastic guns attached that you’d no doubt begged a responsible adult to let you have a go of at least once, or if you’re much older than I am, perhaps you’ve had to deter your own children from the game once or twice. Alas, Time Crisis went down such a treat that the light-gun shooter eventually came to PlayStation in 1997 (and even mobile, now), with a GunCon attachment to emulate the arcade experience at home.

The PlayStation port was largely the same game, albeit with some new stages for fans to enjoy. In it, you play as an international intelligence agent, Richard Miller, as he attempts to rescue the president’s daughter (much like Leon Kennedy in Resident Evil 4). Rather than mowing down zombies and cultists as Leon did though, Richard Miller has a criminal organization to take down instead, while being careful not to kill off any innocent civilians.


Honorable Mentions

As much as we wish we could, we can’t fit every single brilliant PS1 game into this list; there's just too many! Here are some additional honorable mentions that didn’t quite make the cut, but are still well worth checking out. As always, be sure to let us know your favorites in the comments!

Gran Turismo 2, Bishi Bashi Special, Grand Theft Auto 2, Frogger, Oddworld: Abe’s Oddysee, Street Fighter Alpha 3, Medal of Honor, Syphon Filter, Croc: Legend of the Gobbos, Einhander, Soul Edge, Yu-Gi-Oh! Forbidden Memories, Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon, Tenchu: Stealth Assassins, Xenogears, Persona 2: Eternal Punishment, Megaman Legends, Grandia, Gex, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Dragon Quest VII, Need for Speed III: Hot Pursuit, Ridge Racer

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