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It's finally happened: PlayStation has signed a deal with Microsoft over Call of Duty

Another big win for Microsoft.

In a surprising Sunday announcement, PlayStation has officially signed a deal with Microsoft to keep Call of Duty on the former's platform.

After months of discussion and deals being formed with a number of companies, today Xbox head Phil Spencer has shared that PlayStation has signed an agreement with Microsoft over Call of Duty. "We are pleased to announce that Microsoft and PlayStation have signed a binding agreement to keep Call of Duty on PlayStation following the acquisition of Activision Blizzard," Spencer wrote on his own Twitter account. "We look forward to a future where players globally have more choice to play their favourite games."

Nothing more has been shared from Spencer aside from that, but this is obviously a massive deal considering how much Sony has voiced complaints and criticisms towards Microsoft over its acquisition of Activision Blizzard. It's probably safe to assume that a similar deal to the 10-year deal with Nintendo has been made, as Microsoft had previously offered a similar deal to PlayStation. This is just the latest step forward for Microsoft that all but assures the deal will go ahead.

Earlier this week, the Federal Trade Commission had its appeal of a federal judge's ruling that will allow Microsoft to acquire Activision Blizzard rejected. With Microsoft having this deal in place with PlayStation, the last big hurdle is now with the UK's Competition and Markets Authority, which also extended its deadline for a final decision on the acquisition earlier this week.

If this deal does go through (and it's looking less and less like an "if"), it'll be the biggest in gaming's history — the deal is costing Microsoft a staggering $70 billion, almost ten times what it paid for Starfield and Fallout developer Bethesda back in 2021.

The deal will also put massive titles like World of Warcraft, Overwatch 2, Candy Crush, and obviously Call of Duty, right in Microsoft's pocket, putting it in a very favourable position for a company that isn't as successful as its competitors in the gaming space.

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